April 22, 2024

From CNN’s Photo Desk

History was made Thursday when former President Donald Trump was indicted by a New York grand jury.

It’s the first time that a current or former US president has been criminally charged.

The Manhattan district attorney’s office has been investigating Trump’s alleged role in a hush money payment scheme and cover-up involving adult film star Stormy Daniels that dates to the 2016 presidential campaign.

Trump is expected to appear in court Tuesday for his arraignment, sources told CNN, and his attorney said he plans to file “substantial” legal challenges. The former president has repeatedly denied wrongdoing in the matter and accused Democrats of targeting him politically.

Trump was bracing for an indictment as early as March 18, when he said in a social media post that he expected to be arrested within days. In his post, he appealed to his supporters for action, writing, “Protest, take our nation back.”

See photos of the days leading up to Trump’s indictment:

Michael Cohen leaves a Manhattan courthouse after testifying before the grand jury on March 13. "My goal is to tell the truth," the former Trump attorney told reporters before testifying. "My goal is to allow Alvin Bragg and his team to do what they need to do. I'm just here to answer the questions."
Michael Cohen leaves a Manhattan courthouse after testifying before the grand jury on March 13. “My goal is to tell the truth,” the former Trump attorney told reporters before testifying. “My goal is to allow Alvin Bragg and his team to do what they need to do. I’m just here to answer the questions.” (Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

Media and protesters are seen outside Bragg's office in New York on March 20. A couple of days earlier, Trump said in a social media post that he expected to be arrested within days.
Media and protesters are seen outside Bragg’s office in New York on March 20. A couple of days earlier, Trump said in a social media post that he expected to be arrested within days. (Mark Peterson/Redux)

Former President Donald Trump leaves after speaking at his rally in Waco on March 25. Trump, who is running for president again, railed against what he called "prosecutorial misconduct" and denied any wrongdoing amid investigations in New York, Georgia and Washington, DC. 
Former President Donald Trump leaves after speaking at his rally in Waco on March 25. Trump, who is running for president again, railed against what he called “prosecutorial misconduct” and denied any wrongdoing amid investigations in New York, Georgia and Washington, DC.  (Brandon Bell/Getty Images)

Manhattan District Attorney Alvin Bragg leaves the Manhattan Criminal Courthouse after the grand jury indicted Trump on March 30.
Manhattan District Attorney Alvin Bragg leaves the Manhattan Criminal Courthouse after the grand jury indicted Trump on March 30. (Dave Sanders/The New York Times/Redux)

Mary Kelley waves a Trump flag near the former president's Mar-a-Lago estate after he was indicted on March 30. 
Mary Kelley waves a Trump flag near the former president’s Mar-a-Lago estate after he was indicted on March 30.  (Josh Ritchie/The New York Times/Redux)

News of Trump's indictment was on the front page of The New York Times on March 31.
News of Trump’s indictment was on the front page of The New York Times on March 31. (David Dee Delgado/Reuters)

1 hr 25 min ago

Pence cautions House GOP about investigating Manhattan district attorney

From CNN’s Veronica Stracqualursi

Pence is interviewed by Fox News’s Neil Cavuto on Friday, March 31.
Pence is interviewed by Fox News’s Neil Cavuto on Friday, March 31. (From Fox News)

Former Vice President Mike Pence on Friday cautioned House Republicans, who have threatened an investigation into the Manhattan district attorney, to “temper their inquiries” and not turn the case into an example of federal overreach in local affairs.

“I’m somebody who believes in federalism, and as wrong as this DA is, I have a check in my spirit about the federal government becoming involved in even wrongheaded local law enforcement or prosecutions,” he told Fox News’ Neil Cavuto in an interview.
“And so I’d want our friends in the Congress to be judicious about that, careful about that. They can certainly ask questions, but at the end of the day, I think that this is a matter the American people see through, they see that politics is driving this decision.”

Pressed by Cavuto if he’s against Republicans’ requests for Manhattan District Attorney Alvin Bragg to testify, Pence said: “Congress has every right to ask whatever questions that they want to ask.”

“But I think beginning with the premise that even bad decisions by state and local government are still an element of our federalism in the country,” he continued. “So I just want them to — I’d want them to temper their inquiries to respect federalism.”

What the GOP lawmakers are saying: Three House Republican leaders — House Judiciary Chairman Rep. Jim Jordan, House Oversight Chairman Rep. James Comer and House Administration Chairman Rep. Bryan Steil – sent a letter last week calling for Bragg’s testimony after former President Donald Trump warned he would be arrested.

The three chairmen accused the district attorney of conducting a politically motivated prosecution and wrote that they intend to investigate whether Bragg and his office used federal public safety funds as part of its grand jury investigation.

Credit: cnn.com

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *